WPL YA-Hoo!

A blog for the Wharton Public Library's young adults.

BE INSPIRED!

yareviewnetwork:

This April marks the eighteenth annual National Poetry Month. I look forward to NPM every year. It’s a time for us to remember the impact poetry has on our lives, to revisit the classic poets, and to discover new voices in poetry. I also feel that National Poetry Month is a time to remind ourselves to be inspired, which is something I found myself doing recently.

When I was in high school I wrote poetry regularly. In addition to my “regular” journal, in which I recorded my day-to-day thoughts, I kept a poetry journal where I composed and edited original verse. Whenever possible, I would carry that poetry journal around with me just in case inspiration struck while I was out and about. I continued this practice in college, where I also had the opportunity to take classes in verse writing.

I would write poetry about anything that inspired me at that particular moment: a flower, a painting, a drop of water, my dirty car, a box of forgotten, old doll clothes. Whenever I came across something that moved me enough to write a poem, I would pull out my poetry journal, and the words would flow from my mind to the paper. I would later go back and rewrite certain verses, crossing out elements that didn’t work and adding in ones that did. The process was time-consuming and creatively exhilarating. Poetry was my chosen vehicle for expressing myself, and I loved it.

Yet something changed once I graduated college. I stopped setting aside time to write poetry. Every now and again I would write a poem or two, but with nowhere near the same regularity I once followed. I can’t pinpoint a concrete reason why I let this happen. I just became so preoccupied with things like graduate school, work, and life in general. I would still have moments of inspiration, but rather than whipping out my poetry journal, which I had given up carrying around, I would make a mental note to write it down later. Inevitably, “later” would never come, and that inspiration would be lost.

Read the rest of Sarah Geisler’s, YARN’s Poetry Reader and Assistant, journey here

And let us know, how do you stay inspired?

depressionpress:

"MINIATURE VICTORIAN MY TINY ALPHABET BOOK BRYCE ILLUSTRATED ANIMALS BIRDS WORDS" | Winning Bid: US $338.93

(via ala-con)

paperbackd:

Book review: She Is Not Invisible by Marcus Sedgwick

I was slightly hesitant to start reading She Is Not Invisible - as a huge fan of Sedgwick’s gothic historical fiction, I wasn’t sure if his style would translate well to realistic fiction.  But I needn’t have worried.  Sedgwick has proved himself one of the best and most versatile British authors of young adult fiction, and She Is Not Invisible is one of the most truthful and heartfelt contemporary realistic novels I’ve ever read.

The entire story takes place over one weekend, as Sedgwick’s protagonist, sixteen-year-old Laureth Peak, abducts her younger brother on a quest to find their missing father, following the clues he left behind in his old notebook. Laureth finds herself alone in a strange city with only her kid brother for company, struggling to understand her father’s cryptic and increasingly disturbing notes. And another thing - she’s blind.

It’s a testament to Sedgwick’s skill as a writer that he is able to write such a vivid story with absolutely no visual cues for the reader to follow.  It’s been so long since I’ve read a novel featuring a disabled protagonist - and one who isn’t solely defined by her disability.  In one particularly brilliant scene, Laureth muses over the lack of realistic blind characters in books, tv shows and movies.  There are only two kinds of blind people, she decides: the pathetic, helpless figures of woe, or the superheroes, whose other senses are somehow magically enhanced.  Laureth, thankfully, falls into neither category.  Yes, she is blind, but she is also sceptical, impulsive, and kind.  She is an ordinary teenage girl and a wonderfully well-rounded character.

The mystery Sedgwick has created pays off; Sedgwick’s ending is satisfying and realistic, but more importantly, it’s engaging, and rewards the reader who pays close attention to every little word.  She Is Not Invisible is the kind of novel that demands a re-read as soon as you’ve turned the final page - the themes of coincidence, obsession and family are so expertly woven into the book that I keep finding new discoveries just by flicking through a few pages at random.

Whatever Sedgwick writes next, it’s bound to be brilliant, and I already can’t wait to read it.

Publisher: Indigo
Rating: 5 stars | ★★

Review cross-posted to Goodreads

Buy on Amazon: US | UK

“It’s still National Library Week. You should be especially nice to a librarian today, or tomorrow. Sometime this week, anyway. Probably the librarians would like tea. Or chocolates. Or a reliable source of funding.”

—   Neil Gaiman (via ala-con)

(via libraryjournal)

sharpegirl:

Far From You by Tess Sharpe Giveaway!
Hey y’all, I’m giving away two signed copies of FAR FROM YOU (with a few extras thrown in!). One copy will have my notes and thoughts about the book scribbled in the margins, and the second copy will contain a handwritten short story about what happens to the characters after FAR FROM YOU ends.
To enter, all you have to do is reblog this post, or tweet a link to the giveaway with the hashtag #farfromyou. This is an international Giveaway and it ends on Monday, April 21st and the winners will be announced on the 22nd! 

sharpegirl:

Far From You by Tess Sharpe Giveaway!

Hey y’all, I’m giving away two signed copies of FAR FROM YOU (with a few extras thrown in!). One copy will have my notes and thoughts about the book scribbled in the margins, and the second copy will contain a handwritten short story about what happens to the characters after FAR FROM YOU ends.

To enter, all you have to do is reblog this post, or tweet a link to the giveaway with the hashtag #farfromyou. This is an international Giveaway and it ends on Monday, April 21st and the winners will be announced on the 22nd! 

amnhnyc:

Museum researcher Mary Blair is blogging from Vietnam, where she’s surveying for endangered primates called slow lorises—at night. 
Read her latest post to find out what she takes into the field—and how she’s training others to spot a loris in the dark.

amnhnyc:

Museum researcher Mary Blair is blogging from Vietnam, where she’s surveying for endangered primates called slow lorises—at night. 

Read her latest post to find out what she takes into the field—and how she’s training others to spot a loris in the dark.

dakotaangel:

Reading Time 。◕‿◕。

dakotaangel:

Reading Time 。◕‿◕。

(via ala-con)

yareviewnetwork:

I will ingeminate (Chrome has placed a red line under the word!) the call for our National Poetry Month poetry contest. 
There are only 7 DAYS LEFT!
Find all the submissions rules here and good luck!
~ Lourdes 

yareviewnetwork:

I will ingeminate (Chrome has placed a red line under the word!) the call for our National Poetry Month poetry contest.

There are only 7 DAYS LEFT!

Find all the submissions rules here and good luck!

~ Lourdes 

The Giver

libralthinking:

nghsnest:

Newest trailer.

Black and white this time,
And LOIS LOWRY is in the trailer!!

Personally, I always envisioned the world in sepia.

(via yareviewnetwork)